sexta-feira , janeiro 18 2019
Home / Columns / Command Beacon / Commander Archetypes: Midrange (Part 1)

Commander Archetypes: Midrange (Part 1)

Hello Ladies and Gentleman!
Welcome to Command Beacon, our column on Multiplayer Commander here on Eternal Magic!

In the last articles, I introduced relevant concepts to work with the archetypes and then I talked about aggressive strategies. Today we will continue the archetypes in the commander by entering the Midrange strategy. And the word that defines it is flexibility. The Midrange has room to adapt to different game situations, easily alternating its posture, either reactive or proactive.

This type of deck develops well in the different stages of a game and one of its strengths is to gain small advantages, especially with card advantage, either direct draw, graveyard recursion or removing resources from opponents in an advantageous way, in order to minimize the your card spend and maximize theirs. This type of advantage is usually implicit in the commander himself, as in the case of [mtg_card]Maelstrom Wanderer[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Meren of Clan Nel Toth[/mtg_card].

In early game, it behaves in a similar way to other decks, trying to accelerate the mana base in order to enable the minimum conditions to allow most of its moves. It is also common to establish a form of card advantage, either by direct draw like [mtg_card]Mystic Remora[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Rhystic Study[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Phyrexian Arena[/mtg_card], or, in cases of decks that abuse the graveyard, ways to allow yourself to start recursion, either with discard outlet (sources that allow you to make discards), like [mtg_card]Putrid Imp[/mtg_card], or feeding the greaveyard directly with cards from the library, by using cards like [mtg_card]Satyr Wayfinder[/mtg_card]. Another interesting detail is that the decks tend to allow early game interactions, with a low cost, being them in the form of removals ([mtg_card]Innocent Blood[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Abrupt Decay[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Nature’s Claim[/mtg_card]) or fast counters ([mtg_card]Mental Misstep[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Swan Song[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Force of Will[/mtg_card]), allowing them to punish and delay players that open up the game in a more explosive way.

The midgame, as its name implies, is the house of the Midrange. The second stage of the game is when the greatest amount of interaction occurs between players and where they establish the advantages that lead to the third stage, establishing a possible winner. At this stage, Midrange is able to propose consistent threats and usually uses cards that have an advantage if they remain in the game, such as [mtg_card]Shelodred, Whispering One[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Consecrated Sphinx[/mtg_card], and [mtg_card]Sword of Feast and Famine[/mtg_card]. At the same time, it can adapt to changes in the state of the game, as they carry consistent responses. Has an opponent gained deep advantage with mana rocks, artifacts and relevant enchantments? [mtg_card]Bane of Progress[/mtg_card] can ruin this whole game and drag it back to the early game. Has the Stax deck seemingly made it impossible for all other players to progress? [mtg_card]Cyclonic Rift[/mtg_card] at the right time usually solves. The aggressive decks set the table and are about to end the match with a lethal attack? [mtg_card]Wrath of God[/mtg_card] is the move. As you set up your game and get in the way, Midrange decks are able to establish themselves ahead of the game, creating the necessary environment for the victory at the late game.

The late game happens when the advantage is established, with a consistent and well-set table and many advantage cards in relation to the others. This transition from midgame to late game may be subtle, but the consistency is clear when it is well done. In order to finish the game, one can attack with high impact creatures or, as is also common, to use some combo. All this while still responds to the opposing moves. Even at the end of the game, they are still flexible decks.

This flexibility rewards the good player of the archetype, but also punishes the one who does a bad reading of the game. Knowing the right time to present your game or to respond to someone else’s is the difference between victory and defeat, and if it is already complex in a 1-on-1 match, in a multiplayer field it becomes even more difficult. Fortunately this view can be gained from practice. Mike Flores, in his classic article “Who’s the Beatdown?” Addresses the players’ posture in a match to define who is the “aggressor” and the “control”, which is crucial for a player with Midrange decks in any format. I recommend the reading. On the subject, I will briefly discuss in today’s article, but I will bring it back and more in depth here in the column, with a focus on multiplayer environments.

Unlike an Aggro, you can slow down the development of your game and respond to opponents’ moves by taking a reactive stance. For example, one of the players, with his [mtg_card]Prime Speaker Zegana[/mtg_card] deck will, on his turn, untap and stay with a total of 9 mana, which he tried to speed-up as fast as possible. The others are all tapped with mana sources. A more experienced player can read what can actually happen. Here it would fit a choice, like playing any threat, tap everything and pass the turn. Or play right. This is possibly the type of situation where the Simic player will use a [mtg_card]Tooth and Nail[/mtg_card] with entwine to fetch [mtg_card]Palinchron[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Deadeye Navigator[/mtg_card], make infinite mana and draw the whole deck. However, the good Midrange player will have made a good reading and will have passed the turn with the untapped mana, making it possible to use [mtg_card]Anguished Unmaking[/mtg_card] to remove the Deadeye Navigator, with Palinchron’s ability still on the stack, shutting down the combo. This was a situation where table reading and an understanding of the correct time to react were required.

In the same way, knowing the time to present your game and impose your rhythm is also essential for victory. All other players have just made a succession of moves to stop one of them from winning, consuming counters and removals. They spent their responses and the main threats at the table were neutralized. After this event, why not use an [mtg_card]Entomb[/mtg_card], so you could, with [mtg_card]Necromancy [/mtg_card], reanimante a [mtg_card]Vorinclex, Voice of Hunger[/mtg_card]? From there on, is just a matter of managing the acquired advantages, a strong point in this kind of deck.

As for Midrange archetypes, it is curious to note that, compared to Aggro and Combo strategies, this is the group with the greatest diversity among strategies. This is due to the distortion that a singleton format (a copy of each card) with larger initial life and multiplayer ends up by providing. The decks have more opportunities and time to develop, allowing strategies a little slower and unviable in other formats. Due to this amount, I will divide this article into 2 parts.

After all, let’s go to the first part of the Midrange archetypes.

Midrange Archetypes

Pain

As the name says, pain is the business of this archetype. They are also known as Punisher and Group Slug and in short, they are extremely punitive decks, although permissive. Everything is allowed, as long as the price is paid in pain and suffering. Cards such as [mtg_card]Underworld Dreams[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Havoc Festival[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Manabarbs[/mtg_card] give rise to development, unlike a Stax control deck, however, drastically limit its duration, putting in the game what we call clock: each turn is a step closer to the end, because effectively a limit is placed in turns. With [mtg_card]Sulfuric Vortex[/mtg_card] for example, in a very friendly and simplistic scenario, will make the game doesn’t last more than 20 turns. Each subsequent move of this type of deck aims to further reduce this time, if possible, surviving the process.

It is important to point out that a Pain needs to establish its table so that its game effectively happens, so it is strongly ruled in the presence of permanents, especially enchantments. If your start is slow, you will not be able to punish the plays of the others, as they will have already done them. So the mana acceleration is critical as well as low cost mana punishments. If the game runs as expected, the plays will have been slowed (or someone will be at the edge of elimination), giving time to speed up the clock and its victory. Although classified as Midrange, it is even common for Pain to have few interactions, and its control portion resides mainly in the constraint caused by punishments and often in Stax elements ([mtg_card]Torpor Orb[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Winter Orb[/mtg_card] for instance).

Defeating a Pain is relatively simple, as the clock often counts for the pilot on that deck as well. It’s a question of managing the damage in our favor. Remove the most problematic parts for your development, if necessary, as you will remember that others are afflicted in the same way. Cause enough damage so that this archetype does not stay ahead as well as forcing it to think twice before any further source of damage goes down. If this type of deck disrupts your strategy a lot, remember that it is based primarily on enchantments, and cards like [mtg_card]Bane of Progress[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Aura Shards[/mtg_card] tend to unbalance them, as well as the damage preventing sources get in the way. [mtg_card]Michiko Konda, Truth Seeker[/mtg_card] makes some tears roll down.

Examples of commanders that might fit in a Pain: [mtg_card]Mogis, God of Slaughter[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Ruric Thar, the Unbowed[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Kaervek the Merciless[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Heartless Hidetsugu[/mtg_card].

As a reference, the king of pain.

[deck]Deck – Nekusar, the Mindrazer (Pain)

Commander
1 Nekusar, the Mindrazer

Creatures
1 Fate Unraveler
1 Jace’s Archivist
1 Magus of the Wheel
1 Whirlpool Warrior

Artifacts
1 Chromatic Lantern
1 Chrome Mox
1 Dimir Signet
1 Gilded Lotus
1 Izzet Signet
1 Mana Crypt
1 Mana Vault
1 Memory Jar
1 Mindcrank
1 Mox Diamond
1 Mox Opal
1 Paradox Engine
1 Pyromancer’s Goggles
1 Rakdos Signet
1 Sol Ring
1 Talisman of Dominance
1 Talisman of Indulgence
1 Teferi’s Puzzle Box
1 Thran Dynamo
1 Torpor Orb
1 Winter Orb

Enchantments
1 Bloodchief Ascension
1 Chains of Mephistopheles
1 Faith of the Devoted
1 Leyline of Anticipation
1 Liliana’s Caress
1 Megrim
1 Spiteful Visions
1 Underworld Dreams
1 Waste Not

Sorceries
1 Blasphemous Act
1 Damnation
1 Dark Deal
1 Demonic Tutor
1 Howl of the Horde
1 Imperial Seal
1 Molten Psyche
1 Personal Tutor
1 Reforge the Soul
1 Time Reversal
1 Timetwister
1 Toxic Deluge
1 Vandalblast
1 Wheel of Fortune
1 Whispering Madness
1 Windfall
1 Winds of Change

Instants
1 Arcane Denial
1 Counterspell
1 Cyclonic Rift
1 Echoing Truth
1 Force of Will
1 Increasing Vengeance
1 Mana Drain
1 Mystical Tutor
1 Pact of Negation
1 Shadow of the Grave
1 Swan Song
1 Trickbind
1 Unsubstantiate
1 Vampiric Tutor
1 Wheel and Deal

Lands
1 Arid Mesa
1 Badlands
1 Blood Crypt
1 Bloodstained Mire
1 Boseiju, Who Shelters All
1 Cavern of Souls
1 Command Tower
1 Dragonskull Summit
1 Drowned Catacomb
1 Flooded Strand
1 Geier Reach Sanitarium
1 Glacial Chasm
2 Island
1 Marsh Flats
1 Mirrorpool
1 Misty Rainforest
1 Mountain
1 Polluted Delta
1 Reflecting Pool
1 Scalding Tarn
1 Smoldering Marsh
1 Spire of Industry
1 Steam Vents
1 Sulfur Falls
1 Sunken Hollow
1 Swamp
1 Underground Sea
1 Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth
1 Verdant Catacombs
1 Volcanic Island
1 Watery Grave
1 Wooded Foothills[/deck] [mtg_card]Nekusar, the Mindrazer[/mtg_card] is one of the biggest representants of this archetype and alone personifies the term Pain. The way found to punish the players is through draws, by the commander itself, [mtg_card]Fate Unraveler[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Underworld Dreams[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Spiteful Vision[/mtg_card]. With these pieces, the list abuses from spin effects, avoiding to have simple draws like the ones provided by [mtg_card]Howling Mine[/mtg_card], which doesn’t figure on the list. Here the Wheels come in all ways: [mtg_card]Wheel of Fortune[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Timetwister[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Reforge the Soul[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Windfall[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Molten Psyche[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Dark Deal[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Jace’s Archivist[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Teferi’s Puzzle Box[/mtg_card], and others. Many are followed by discards, that’s why [mtg_card]Liliana’s Caress[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Megrim[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Faith of the Devoted[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Waste Not[/mtg_card] have become abusive on this list, especially when we copy all the wheels with [mtg_card]Howl of the Horde[/mtg_card] or [mtg_card]Increasing Vengeance[/mtg_card], sometimens causing enough damage to eliminate all the opponents in a single round. Lastly, to achieve the necessary conditions, we abuse from mana rocks to speed it up, while using control elements to get a hold of the others or to continue your game without being stopped. Among these elements there are counters that go since [mtg_card]Mana Drain[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Swan Song[/mtg_card] to removals like [mtg_card]Vandalblast[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Echoing Truth[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Damnation[/mtg_card].

Good Stuff

It is well known that there are numerous high power level cards in Commander and in several different categories, such as [mtg_card]Consecrated Sphinx[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Sun Titan[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Deathrite Shaman[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Swords to Ploshares[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Cyclonic Rift[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Rhystic Study[/mtg_card], among many others. The Good Stuff archetype does not care if the cards have synergy between them or not, its concern is how good a card is by itself. The law here is to use high quality individual cards and so 3-colored decks or more usually do better. The concept of a “good card” is completely debatable and I intend to approach that point at another time, but even a deck that has several bad cards and no clear identity can end up being classified as belonging to that archetype. So it is very common the first deck of a new player in the format to be a collection of several cards without cohesion and, therefore, be classified under the nickname of Good Stuff.

At first, the game plan of the archetype is to try to accelerate your game to the midgame and from there to dump a good card after a good card. Regardless of what they are, a good Good Stuff will always be responded and only supported by some good card advantage mechanism, so drawing and recursion are the key. That’s why commanders who provide this quality to the deck usually do better. At the end of the game, the idea is to drown opponents in quality and quantity of the best cards in the game, be they powerful creatures, planeswalkers or artifacts.

Stopping a Good Stuff is not the simplest of tasks, because there is not necessarily a linear strategy on which it stands and can easily be attacked. It is necessary to observe the development of the game and make an analysis of the threats. But an important point is to interrupt its draw or recursion mechanisms, using cards such as [mtg_card]Chains of Mephistophelis[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Rest in Peace[/mtg_card]. If the source is the commander itself, remove it or prevent it from triggering the abilities. The important thing is that he cannot have any more cards than you.

Examples of commanders that might fit in a Good Stuff: [mtg_card]Maelstrom Wanderer[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Atraxa, Praetor’s Voice[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Damia, Sage of Stone[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Prime Speaker Zegana[/mtg_card].

Representing the archetype, nothing better than a commander that literally provides a cascade of card advantage.

[deck]Deck – Yidris Maelstrom Wielder (Good Stuff)
Commander
1 Yidris, Maelstrom Wielder

Creatures
1 Birds of Paradise
1 Bloom Tender
1 Deadeye Navigator
1 Eternal Witness
1 Etherium-Horn Sorcerer
1 Great Whale
1 Hydra Omnivore
1 Ingot Chewer
1 Maelstrom Wanderer
1 Mulldrifter
1 Palinchron
1 Peregrine Drake
1 Prime Speaker Zegana
1 Rakdos, Lord of Riots
1 Reclamation Sage
1 Scourge of the Throne
1 Sheoldred, Whispering One
1 Shriekmaw
1 Tasigur, the Golden Fang

Artifacts
1 Aetherflux Reservoir
1 Chromatic Lantern
1 Dimir Signet
1 Fellwar Stone
1 Gilded Lotus
1 Golgari Signet
1 Gruul Signet
1 Izzet Signet
1 Lightning Greaves
1 Mana Crypt
1 Rakdos Signet
1 Scroll Rack
1 Sensei’s Divining Top
1 Simic Signet
1 Sol Ring
1 Thran Dynamo

Enchantments
1 Mana Reflection
1 Sylvan Library
1 Treachery

Sorceries
1 Ancestral Vision
1 Beacon of Tomorrows
1 Capture of Jingzhou
1 Dark Petition
1 Demonic Tutor
1 Farseek
1 Imperial Seal
1 Mind’s Desire
1 Mystic Retrieval
1 Nature’s Lore
1 Part the Waterveil
1 Temporal Manipulation
1 Temporal Mastery
1 Three Visits
1 Time Spiral
1 Time Warp
1 Toxic Deluge
1 Treasure Cruise
1 Walk the Aeons
1 Wheel of Fate

Instants
1 Dig Through Time
1 Frantic Search
1 Krosan Grip
1 Mystic Confluence
1 Mystical Tutor
1 Snuff Out
1 Vampiric Tutor

Lands
1 Arid Mesa
1 Badlands
1 Bayou
1 Blood Crypt
1 Bloodstained Mire
1 Breeding Pool
1 Cavern of Souls
1 Command Tower
1 Flooded Strand
2 Forest
4 Island
1 Marsh Flats
1 Misty Rainforest
1 Mountain
1 Overgrown Tomb
1 Polluted Delta
1 Reflecting Pool
1 Scalding Tarn
1 Steam Vents
1 Stomping Ground
1 Swamp
1 Taiga
1 Tropical Island
1 Underground Sea
1 Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth
1 Verdant Catacombs
1 Volcanic Island
1 Watery Grave
1 Windswept Heath
1 Wooded Foothills[/deck] [mtg_card]Yidris, Maelstrom Wielder[/mtg_card] is the Card Advantage portrait when allowing to abuse one of the most stupid abilities of Magic: Cascade. Basically, each card cast is equivalent for 2, being one of them a lower cost one and random. The deck basically abuses from spells that can be cast by alternative costs ([mtg_card]Mulldrifter[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Tasigur, the Golden Fang[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Treasure Cruise[/mtg_card]) or that allow to untap permanents effectively costing a lot less. ([mtg_card]Palinchron[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Peregrine Drake[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Great Whale[/mtg_card]) creating high value cascades and consequently powerful cards like [mtg_card]Scourge of the Throne[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Sheoldred, Whispering One[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Hydra Omnivore[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Aetherflux Reservoir[/mtg_card] or one of the many extra turns, like [mtg_card]Time Warp[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Temporal Manipulation[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Capture of Jingzhou[/mtg_card]. When the commander fits its attack it gets an absurd torrent of good cards at the point of creating a battlefield that if doesn’t win during that turn (or in one of the extra turns), there will hardly be others due to the extreme advantage generated.

True Midrange

We previously defined a Midrange deck as a flexible deck with a balanced amount of threats and responses, allowing you to switch between a proactive and reactive posture. And for this to work you need a good Card Advantage mechanism. The True Midrange archetype is the one that most closely embodies this strategy.

True Midrange is one of the few archetypes to efficiently abuse punctual responses. Usually this type of response is often disadvantageous because there are several opponents on a table and, when you spend a card to take out a card from another player, the other opponents of the table get ahead in the amount of resources available. However, a True Midrange has the ability to prevent this deficiency with good draw or recursion mechanisms, and this should be the main pillar of the deck. So, virtually, you’re not too late regarding the rest. Cheap responses are the demand of these decks, as well as cheap creatures that bring benefits or those that hinder the lives of the others, the famous hatebears, in this case. In this way, a game of friction is developed in which these decks come out in the advantage in the medium and long term.

Just like Good Stuff, the gear that must be waged to counter a True Midrange are the Card Advantage sources. By stopping this mechanism, you force this archetype to consume itself quickly, running out of cards and losing in the resource war. From then on it becomes simpler to combat what is already on the in play. If it is full of hatebears, a board wipe like [mtg_card]Toxic Deluge[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Damnation[/mtg_card] should settle things. For the sharp responses, ways to protect your permanents may be relatively effective, so [mtg_card]Lightning Greaves[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Swiftfoot Boots[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Asceticism[/mtg_card] might work kinda good with this archetype, although they’re not a guarantee for being able to be removed.

Examples of commanders that might fit in a Good Stuff: [mtg_card]Anafenza, the Foremost[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Thrasios, Triton Hero[/mtg_card] & [mtg_card]Tymna the Weaver[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Damia, Sage of Stone[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Edric, Spymaster of Trest[/mtg_card].

For the list, 2 hatebears partners.

[deck]Deck – Tymna the Weaver & Sidar Kondo of Jamuraa (True Midrange)

Commanders
1 Tymna the Weaver
1 Sidar Kondo of Jamuraa

Creatures
1 Acidic Slime
1 Avacyn’s Pilgrim
1 Aven Mindcensor
1 Azusa, Lost but Seeking
1 Birds of Paradise
1 Containment Priest
1 Courser of Kruphix
1 Dark Confidant
1 Dauntless Escort
1 Eidolon of Rhetoric
1 Elves of Deep Shadow
1 Eternal Witness
1 Gaddock Teeg
1 Grand Abolisher
1 Hokori, Dust Drinker
1 Hushwing Gryff
1 Kambal, Consul of Allocation
1 Kataki, War’s Wage
1 Leonin Arbiter
1 Manglehorn
1 Mirror Entity
1 Mother of Runes
1 Qasali Pridemage
1 Reclamation Sage
1 Recruiter of the Guard
1 Sanctum Prelate
1 Scavenging Ooze
1 Serra Ascendant
1 Sun Titan
1 Sylvan Safekeeper
1 Thalia, Guardian of Thraben
1 Thalia, Heretic Cathar
1 Vryn Wingmare
1 Weathered Wayfarer

Artifacts
1 Crucible of Worlds
1 Mana Crypt
1 Null Rod
1 Sol Ring

Enchantments
1 Aura of Silence
1 Aura Shards
1 Beastmaster Ascension
1 Exploration
1 Gideon’s Intervention
1 Nevermore
1 Rest in Peace
1 Song of the Dryads
1 Stony Silence

Sorceries
1 Council’s Judgment
1 Demonic Tutor
1 Immortal Servitude
1 Maelstrom Pulse
1 Regrowth
1 Vindicate

Instants
1 Abrupt Decay
1 Anguished Unmaking
1 Beast Within
1 Chord of Calling
1 Diabolic Edict
1 Fatal Push
1 Heroic Intervention
1 Hero’s Downfall
1 Krosan Grip
1 Path to Exile
1 Swords to Plowshares
1 Unexpectedly Absent
1 Utter End
1 Vampiric Tutor

Lands
1 Arid Mesa
1 Bayou
1 Bloodstained Mire
1 Bojuka Bog
1 Command Tower
1 Flooded Strand
2 Forest
1 Gaea’s Cradle
1 Godless Shrine
1 Isolated Chapel
1 Marsh Flats
1 Misty Rainforest
1 Overgrown Tomb
4 Plains
1 Polluted Delta
1 Reflecting Pool
1 Savannah
1 Scrubland
1 Strip Mine
1 Sunpetal Grove
1 Swamp
1 Temple Garden
1 Verdant Catacombs
1 Wasteland
1 Windswept Heath
1 Wooded Foothills
1 Woodland Cemetery[/deck]

This True Midrange has a structure based on the hatebears, small creatures that delay the opponents’ game by controlling their permanents ([mtg_card]Manglehorn[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Reclamation Sage[/mtg_card], etc) and creating conditions that limit their plays ([mtg_card]Aven Mindcensor[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Eidolon of Rhetoric[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Gaddock Teeg[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Thalia, Heretic Cathar[/mtg_card], etc). At the same time, the deck is filled with single removals, like [mtg_card]Abrupt Decay[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Swords to Plowshares[/mtg_card], [mtg_card]Beast Within[/mtg_card] and [mtg_card]Utter End[/mtg_card]. But as a True Midrange, for this single removal structure to work we need an efficient draw mechanism, which comes in the form of one of our commanders: [mtg_card]Tymna the Weaver[/mtg_card]. With her in play, it is standarized to draw at least 4 cards per turn in a typical game. For that to happen is having caused damaged to different opponents and blockers might get in the way of these mechanics. That’s why Tymna’s partner in this list is [mtg_card]Sidar Kondo of Jamuraa[/mtg_card], which virtually make the overwhelming majority of our creatures unlockable by spinning the deck engine and creating a friction game that will hardly be left behind if properly managed.

Well, dear ones. That’s it for today. Next week we shall continue with the part 2 of Midrang archetypes in Commander. I hope you’ve enjoyed and see you soon!

About Redação

Deixe uma resposta

O seu endereço de e-mail não será publicado. Campos obrigatórios são marcados com *